Friday Fifteen

Happy Friday, guys! It’s the last Friday of 2016, and I am super glad to kiss this year goodbye. Let’s endeavor to stay strong, stay focused, stay positive, and stay supportive in 2017. In the meantime, let’s close out 2016 with a look at what I’ve been reading in fifteen words or fewer (because it’s winter break and I’m on vacation).

Essential Maps for the Lost by Deb Caletti
Caletti’s writing is beautiful, and Mads and Billy are heartbreaking.

Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman
A fun, British-fueled romp toward the apocalypse. I need a miniseries now.

26.2: Marathon Stories by Kathrine Switzer and Roger Robinson
I guess I’m the kind of person who reads sports writing now. Yay running!

Friday Fifteen

Happy Friday, guys! Between the heat and the excitement of the summer Olympics (oh my lord, those gymnasts!), I am super feeling August right now. While I cling desparately to my iced tea, let’s get the weekend started with a look at what I’ve been reading and writing:

Reading: Cinder by Marissa Meyer
Cyborg Cinderella plus galactic political intrigue plus an adorable prince equals a big yes!

Writing: “I think I’ll never have another first time I went sledding, and I’m blindsided by sadness.”
Main character starts having some feels.

Friday Fifteen

Happy Friday, everyone! I’m extra excited for this Friday, because it’s the start of ALA weekend here in Boston, which means I get to meet some of my favorite librarians and bloggers and writers in person. Book lovers unite!

In case you’re in town for the conference or a YA-loving local, don’t forget to come to tonight’s Real Teen Lives YA panel at Brookline Booksmith (7pm EST)! In the meantime, let’s kick off the weekend with a look at what I’ve been reading and writing in fifteen words or fewer.

Reading: Bitch Planet, Vol 1: Extraordinary Machine (Bitch Planet #1-5) by Kelly Sue DeConnick, Valentine De Landro, Taki Soma, Robert Wilson
Started off the year with some feminist sci-fi graphic novel goodness.

Writing: “I wonder if Ms. Simpson is somewhere now, walking with the living and reciting poetry.”
My latest short story (about poetry and the zombie apocalypse) is up at the Hanging Garden.

Friday Fifteen

Happy Friday, everyone! I’m kind of stunned that it’s already the first Friday of November–wasn’t it just summer? I was traveling this week and didn’t get a lot of writing done, but I did use my travel time to catch up on some reading, so this week’s Friday Fifteen is a double-dose of micro book reviews:

This Monstrous Thing by Mackenzi Lee
A thrilling take on Frankenstein and what it means to be a monster. Miyazaki adaptation, please!

What I Talk About When I Talk About Running by Haruki Murakami
Loved this look at long-distance running as I prepare for my first marathon.

Awards and Hoverboards: Expectations of Your Writing Future

It’s October 21, 2015. Welcome to the future, everyone!

Okay, so no hoverboards for the masses yet, and our 80s-inspired clothes look a little different. But today’s Back to the Future festivities did get me thinking about the future and expectations.

As writers, it’s easy to build up expectations and ideas of success. You put a lot of time and effort into a given project, and you hope that time and effort will be rewarded by a agent offering representation, or a book deal, or an award, or a movie, or a place at the top of the best-seller list. You set deadlines for yourself–finish a draft by X date, query by Y, get an agent by Z. Surely in twenty years, you’ll be at ALA, accepting your Printz award from atop your hoverboard, right?

At last year’s retreat in Tennessee, someone (I think it was Tessa Gratton) mentioned that “at some point, everything in publishing will happen to you.” From getting a book deal to getting a book pushed back to getting a book cancelled; from rejections to sales at auctions; from tons of marketing support and movie deals to seeing a book just like yours make a huge splash while yours falls flat–the good and the bad all happens at some point. No matter what you do or how hard you work, you can’t control the whole process.

So what does that mean for the future of your writing career? Don’t focus on the hoverboard. Forget the movie deals, the sales at auction, the awards ceremonies. Focus on the part you can control–writing the best work you can. Even if you can’t predict the future, you’ll know that you made the very best book you could.

As Doc Brown said: “Your future is whatever you make it. So make it a good one.”

Friday Fifteen

Happy Friday, guys! I’m powering through revisions and am emotionally unprepared for how cold it’s going to get over the weekend here in the Boston area. In the meantime, here’s a look at what I’ve been reading and writing in fifteen words or under.

Reading: The Martian by Andy Weir
Fun and funny and loved how it embraced science. Mentally cast Anthony Mackie as Watney.

Writing: “…pretend that I have a little more creativity than spiking the punch at College Night.”
Character has standards for his pranks.

Links Galore

Lots of link-y goodness:

Update #4: 48 Hour Book Challenge of 2014

Another book down for the challenge.

photo (4)Update #4:

  • 3.5 hours reading time (10.5 total)
  • 402 pages read (1316 pages total)
  • 1 iced coffee (2 total)

The Books

Review #4:

After Daughter of Smoke and Bone, I was in the mood for something similarly exciting but outside the fantasy realm. Adaptation by Melinda Lo was always on my radar, but for some reason I hadn’t checked it out yet. Definitely glad I did! I was hooked immediately–planes crashing, government cover-ups, weird genetic experiments–and enjoyed that Lo also focused on the characters themselves. Lo handles Reese’s feelings toward both Amber and David with sensitivity, and I appreciated a cast of supporting characters (like Julian and her mom) who felt real as well. Another book in a trilogy (that seems to be the theme for my 48 hour book challenge), I’m interested to see where this story goes.

Note: this one I got as a library download this morning. Holla to electronic library resources!

TLT’s Doctor Who Week and How I Learned to Unabashedly Love Sci-Fi

Today I’m over at Teen Librarian Toolbox as part of Doctor Who Week, talking about how Doctor Who helped me finally admit that I’m a sci-fi fan. In very short, my thoughts on sci-fi before Who:

My thoughts on sci-fi after Who:

Click through for the full post, which has more explanation about genre and feelings, and also gifs! Make sure to check out the other posts in Doctor Who Week, too, and keep an eye out for my second post at TLT (coming on Friday).

Links Galore

A few more links to round out Friday: